VPG Couple Celebrates Special Ties to Thanksgiving as Descendants of Mayflower

Living on the South Shore of Massachusetts, Thanksgiving is a time of year not only to be grateful for all we have but also to reflect upon the journey our ancestors made from England to the new world, first landing locally in nearby Plymouth, Massachusetts.

In September 1620, just over 130 passengers and crew members boarded the Mayflower in search of a better life and made the journey across the Atlantic. Of that group, just 53 survived the first winter.

According to TheMayflowerSociety.org, “In 1897, the General Society of Mayflower Descendants was established to pay homage to the Pilgrims through preservation and education. The Mayflower Society now has a network of more than 54 member societies across the world. [Its] members have formed lifelong bonds together while honoring the sacred legacy of our ancestors.”

Two of these Mayflower descendants are Mary Ann and David Worthington – current residents of the Village at Proprietors Green in Marshfield.

“We first met during our college years on the UMASS Campus,” recalled Mary Ann Worthington. “As we got to know each other, we found out that we are both descendants of passengers on the Mayflower. Today, we are both proud members of the Society of Mayflower Descendants!”

Pictured: Mary Ann and David Worthington, Village at Proprietors Green residents, proudly showcasing their document proving their Mayflower ties.

Coincidentally, Mary Ann Worthington has a direct link to Isaac Allerton – one of the many reasons she was so excited to be living at Village at Proprietors Green’s Allerton House! Allerton was one of the original Pilgrim fathers who came on the Mayflower to settle the Plymouth Colony in 1620. Allerton is an ancestor of Presidents of the United States Zachary Taylor and Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Due to their unique ties to the local area through their individual genealogies, both Mary Ann and David were interested in settling closer to their roots back on the South Shore of Massachusetts.

“We’re getting on in years and we wanted to have a wonderful place to live,” shared the couple. “Well, here we are at Allerton House at Village at Proprietors Green in Marshfield! We’ve made all kinds of friends. We love being back in Massachusetts after having lived in Florida, Connecticut, and other places. We are just delighted to be here!”

VPG Staff Member Derek Morrison Featured in Coastal Mariner

Village at Proprietors Green’s own Derek Morrison and his girlfriend were featured prominently in local paper The Coastal Mariner on September 22, 2022.

Morrison’s girlfriend is from Ukraine, and she escaped the current war with Derek’s help and now lives locally in Marshfield. Derek began his career at VPG in high school as a dining room server and has worked in a number of different positions throughout our community. He is currently on our maintenance team helping to keep our community in top shape for our residents.

See below for The Coastal Mariner article to learn more about Morrison and his girlfriend, Valerie Musiienko.


Ukrainian woman flees war, moves to MA with boyfriend she met on language learning app

By Ruth Thompson, Coastal Mariner, 9/21/22. To read the original article, please visit the Coastal Mariner website. All images here including header image are courtesy Wicked Local/Coastal Mariner.

It was the middle of the night when Derek Morrison was woken by a phone call. It was his girlfriend, Valerie Musiienko, who lives in Ukraine, and things were starting to happen, she told him. 

This was February 2022 and “things” meant Russia was invading Ukraine. 

“I was frozen and speechless,” said Derek, a Marshfield resident. 

Derek Morrison and Valerie Musiienko on a visit to Scituate Lighthouse.
Derek Morrison and Valerie Musienko on a visit to
Situate Lighthouse. Courtesy Photo

After speaking with Derek, Valerie had to focus on getting her belongings gathered up so she would be ready at a moment’s notice. 

“Ready for what,” she said. “None of us knew.” 

As the war escalated in Kyiv, where Valerie lived, she evacuated amid bombings to places outside of the city.  

Derek, home in the U.S., felt compelled to do something. After discussions with his family, and discussions with Valerie’s family, he journeyed to Poland to meet up with her and bring her, and her two cats, back to the States. 

Long distance relationship 

Derek and Valerie first met in March 2020 on the HelloTalk app – a language learning app that allows people to practice speaking a foreign language. The app clearly states it is not to be used for dating, but sometimes the unexpected happens. 

“Valerie and I met shortly after my father passed away.” Derek said. “It was also a few weeks after I broke my hand and was pretty much stuck at home, so it was nice having someone to talk with on a regular basis.” 

Valeriia Musiienko of Kyiv, Ukraine is now living in Marshfield since July 27 with the help of her partner, Derek Morrison, whom she met while he was learning Russian and she was learning English two and a half years ago. The sunflower is the national flower of Ukraine and she has a love for the ocean which she gets to enjoy at Rexhame Beach now that she is staying in Marshfield on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022.
Valeria Musiienko of Kyiv, Ukraine is now living in Marshfield since July 27 with the help of her partner, Derek Morrison, whom she met while he was learning Russian and she was learning English two and a half years ago. The sunflower is the national flower of Ukraine and she has a love for the ocean which she gets to enjoy at Rexhame Beach now that she is staying in Marshfield on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022. Robin Chan/ Wicked Local Staff Photo

The couple really enjoyed their conversations as days turned to weeks and then into months, they said. 

“We’d video chat, watch movies over Zoom, and have phone calls while Derek drove home from work,” Valerie said. “I’m not sure at which point we decided it was a good idea to fall in love with someone halfway across the world, but at least we both decided it was worth the risk.” 

While her family lived outside of the city, Valerie had moved to Kyiv in 2013 to attend university. As she worked on her degree, she wanted to improve her English and began taking classes on the English language, which she said she fell in love with. 

“I realized I wanted to help others to see that learning languages can be fun and resultative,” she said. “I was learning teaching methodology and the past year I lived alone working as an online English tutor for teenagers and adults.” 

Bombing Kyiv 

 “The war divided my life into two parts — before and after the war,” Valerie said. 

After talking with Derek until the early morning hours of Feb. 24, Valerie woke up to a call at 5 a.m. from her mother. 

“She said, ‘The war has started; they are bombing Kyiv. Get up! Do you hear anything?’ And right after that I heard a few loud explosions,” Valerie said. 

She realized she couldn’t move; and couldn’t feel her legs at all for a while, due to the shock of what was happening.  

“I was trying to pull myself together to come up with a plan, but it was hard hearing all those explosions one after another. I was shaking and felt nauseous. I had to pull myself together since I had no one by my side to calm me down.” 

Valeriia Musiienko of Kyiv, Ukraine is now living in Marshfield since July 27 with the help of her partner, Derek Morrison, whom she met while he was learning Russian and she was learning English two and half years ago. The sunflower is the national flower of Ukraine and she has a love for the ocean which she gets to enjoy at Rexhame Beach now that she is staying in Marshfield on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022.
Valeria Musiienko of Kyiv, Ukraine is now living in Marshfield since July 27 with the help of her partner, Derek Morrison, whom she met while he was learning Russian and she was learning English two and a half years ago. The sunflower is the national flower of Ukraine and she has a love for the ocean which she gets to enjoy at Rexhame Beach now that she is staying in Marshfield on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022. Robin Chan/ Wicked Local Staff Photo

That’s when she ended up calling Derek to let him know what was happening and that she was alive in case she lost cell service.   

“I couldn’t leave Kyiv,” she said. “It was hell outside. There were a lot of people, a lot of cars. People were trying to get gas and leave. The line at the gas station I saw was so long I didn’t see the end of it.” 

She met up with a friend and her friend’s young son. They stayed together and collected some food, pet food and medicine, prepared everything important she could think of, and then checked where they could hide – the nearest underground parking garage. 

“We didn’t have a bomb shelter near where we lived,” she said. “I checked to see if we had any military objects near the area, because that’s what we expected the Russian military to target. We didn’t but it didn’t matter because after a few hours I saw a video from my friend with a building, and instead of some floors there was a hole.  A missile hit the apartment building. I knew people who lived there. Their apartment was ruined, but luckily they weren’t home.” 

Through the window on the 25th floor, she saw smoke and shooting, Valerie said.  

“I had no idea if it was our air defense or Russian fire. It scared us. It was very loud. Even one day like this is enough to have nightmares for six months and be scared of any loud sound.” 

Valerie, her friend, and her friend’s son got into a car with their pets and all the bags they had gotten together for a short trip to a small house outside of Kyiv, not completely ready to be lived in, where her friend’s family – about 25 people – were. 

“We spent the night there, sleeping on the floor,” Valerie said.  “Can’t call is sleeping, though. I heard planes and then explosions from time to time.” 

The reality of war with Russia

War is not something you can describe, Valerie said.   

“On the first day I wanted it to be a dream. I kept saying to myself, ‘please wake up.’  I was checking to see if everyone I knew was alive all the time and if they needed any help. I thought we would die, and I wanted to talk to my family as often as I could. I didn’t believe we, Ukraine, would last very long.” 

She couldn’t help to think how unfair it was. 

“We have great people and a beautiful country with so many traditions, beautiful sites to see, and amazing food,” Valerie said. “And the country that was once your ‘friend’ just comes to kill you and destroy everything you have. I remember I thought about self-defense, like if a Russian soldier came in would I be able to kill him to protect myself?” 

Valeriia Musiienko of Kyiv, Ukraine is now living in Marshfield since July 27 with the help of her partner, Derek Morrison, whom she met while he was learning Russian and she was learning English two and a half years ago. The sunflower is the national flower of Ukraine and she has a love for the ocean which she gets to enjoy at Rexhame Beach now that she is living in Marshfield on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022.
Valeria Musiienko of Kyiv, Ukraine is now living in Marshfield since July 27 with the help of her partner, Derek Morrison, whom she met while he was learning Russian and she was learning English two and a half years ago. The sunflower is the national flower of Ukraine and she has a love for the ocean which she gets to enjoy at Rexhame Beach now that she is staying in Marshfield on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022. Robin Chan/ Wicked Local Staff Photo

And the Russians were coming. They were trying to invade Kyiv, and Valerie was afraid she wouldn’t be able to leave if that happened. 

A friend kindly offered to help – he was traveling with a couple to  the western part of Ukraine, she said. 

They were driven to a small town near the border of Ukraine and Romania, allowing them to be able to leave the country any time.   

“A friend of a friend offered his apartment to us. We were driving for 30 hours – normally it would take 10 to 12 hours. There were five people and five cats in the car.” 

During the ride they saw ruined roads and buildings, burned big trucks, military planes flying overhead, and columns of military vehicles, and heard air sirens on the radio, Valerie said. 

“We stayed in that small apartment with only one couch to sleep on for two months,” Valerie said. “We couldn’t find any other place to stay. Even money wouldn’t help. Stores were half empty, ATMs didn’t work. I was glad we had something to eat and a place to sleep and we didn’t hear any explosions, which was more important. But we heard sirens pretty often.”   

The sirens were loud and woke the group up a few times at night for several nights. 

“I was hiding in a bathroom at first,” she said. “After a few times, I stopped doing that. It was too exhausting to spend hours sitting in there. I can’t imagine how people lived in basements for weeks.” 

A friend in the U.S. 

Valerie was in touch with Derek all this time, she said. 

“He would wake up whenever I called him and talk to me if I needed support.  And I needed him a lot back then because I couldn’t handle all the emotions myself. I couldn’t cry for two months, that’s how terrified I was. Sometimes he helped me to go through it and let my emotions out in a different way. I’m lucky to have his support. No matter if it’s just a bad day or a war in my country, he is always there for me.” 

According to Derek, he and Valerie had been planning to continue their relationship by having her move to the U.S. via a K1 visa, also known as the “fiancé visa.” 

“We actually had begun the process right around the time the war began,” he said. 

Valeriia Musiienko of Kyiv, Ukraine is now living in Marshfield since July 27 with the help of her partner, Derek Morrison, whom she met while he was learning Russian and she was learning English two and a half years ago. The sunflower is the national flower of Ukraine and she has a love for the ocean which she gets to enjoy at Rexhame Beach now that she is staying in Marshfield on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022.
Valeria Musiienko of Kyiv, Ukraine is now living in Marshfield since July 27 with the help of her partner, Derek Morrison, whom she met while he was learning Russian and she was learning English two and a half years ago. The sunflower is the national flower of Ukraine and she has a love for the ocean which she gets to enjoy at Rexhame Beach now that she is staying in Marshfield on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022. Robin Chan/ Wicked Local Staff Photo

After the war started, Derek researched the federal government mention of accepting Ukrainian refugees into the U.S.; he even reached out to members of Congress for more information, with no results. Then a couple of months later, the U.S. announced a program called “Uniting for Ukraine,” which allows U.S. citizens to directly sponsor individual Ukrainians for residency in the U.S. 

“Valerie and I decided this would be the best option,” he said. 

Derek’s mother, whom he lives with, was supportive of the idea. 

“My mother had been messaging with Valerie for a while,” he said. “We’d been together for almost two years by that time. When the war began, my mom would ask me almost every day what we could do to help. She and her friends even went so far as to get some money together to send to Valerie and her family. When I brought up the possibility of Valerie moving here, she said yes without any hesitation.”

From Ukraine to Poland to USA 

Valerie, her mother, and sister went to Poland from Ukraine to connect with Derek, who had traveled to Poland to bring Valerie back to the U.S.

The trip, he said, was “great” and he was able to meet Valerie’s mother and sister for the first time.

“In Poland we stayed in Krakow and explored the city,” he said of the three days they were there. “Our trip was cut a bit short because of the travel issues, but hopefully the next time we are with her family we can spend more time together.” 

Derek Morrison of Marshfield traveled to Poland to meet with girlfriend, Valerie Musiienko, second from left, her mother and sister who live in Ukraine.  Valerie returned to the States with Derek to start a new life here.
Derek Morrison of Marshfield traveled to Poland to meet with girlfriend, Valerie Musiienko, second from left, her mother and sister who live in Ukraine. Valerie returned to the States with Derek to start a new life here. Courtesy Photo

On the way home, their first flight was cancelled but after hours of searching they were lucky to find a train route that could bring them to Germany for their connecting flight. 

“Twenty-one hours and five trains later we arrived in Germany and made it in time for our flight home,” he said. 

Coming to the U.S. was more than difficult, said Valerie, who had never been here before. 

“I left my family and my friends, but my mom and Derek insisted so I listened to them and left. But every day I fight the feeling of guilt.”

There is not a day that goes by where she does not pray for her family and friends who are still in Ukraine, she said. 

Valerie’s two cats accompanied her on the long journey to the U.S. 

“It was difficult to travel to Poland and then to Germany – five different trains for a 20-plus hour trip, then an eight-hour flight to the U.S.,” she said.  “These cats are heroes.” 

Getting used to life in the United States

So far Valerie’s experience in the U.S. has been positive. 

“I can say that everything I saw is beautiful here,” she said. “People are very different and very polite and kind. A lot of people are very welcoming. There is no place like home, of course, but I guess I already love my second home because of the people I have in it.” 

Valeriia Musiienko of Kyiv, Ukraine enjoys the ocean and Rexhame Beach with her partner, Derek Morrison, which she has been able to now that she has escaped the war in Ukraine and is living in Marshfield on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022.
Valeria Musiienko of Kyiv, Ukraine enjoys the ocean and Rexhame Beach with her partner, Derek Morrison, which she has been able to now that she has escaped the war in Ukraine and is living in Marshfield on Wednesday, Sept. 14, 2022. Robin Chan/ Wicked Local Staff Photo

In terms of language, Valerie thinks she’s doing OK with English. 

“I make a lot of mistakes, especially when I’m trying to speak fast or when I’m not focused. But in general, I have a good command of English. It’s enough to communicate with native speakers. Sometimes people speak too fast so I may ask to repeat. That’s the only problem that I faced so far.” 

Valerie loves the beach, and she and Derek went almost every day for the first week she was in Marshfield. The couple also went to Boston for the first time in late August for a Ukrainian festival celebrating Ukrainian independence day.   

Aside from that, Derek has been busy at work; they are trying to save money so they can get their own place. 

They are also working on getting a green card for Valerie, and eventually her citizenship. 

“It will be a long process, but so far we’ve been up for every challenge,” Derek said. 

Derek Morrison and Valerie Musiienko attend a festival in Boston celebrating Ukrainian independence day.
Derek Morrison and Valerie Musiienko attend a festival in Boston celebrating Ukrainian independence day. Courtesy Photo

As for things back home, Valerie’s family is living about 60 miles from the frontline, but they are O.K. and have everything they need, she said. 

“My sister started school online. It’s dangerous to study offline. We speak every day and I tell them all about my new experiences.” 

Valerie shared her story so that people could learn more about the war, she said. 

“I believe everyone can be helpful.  We stand for the same values that Americans stand for – freedom and independence. As long as Americans are aware of the situation and support Ukraine, the American government will help Ukraine too.  And Ukrainians really appreciate every country that helps, especially the USA.” 

Unfortunately, she added, the way to victory is “long and bloody.” 

“Our small country is fighting for freedom with the biggest aggressive country in the world. But I believe Ukraine is brave enough and our partners are supporting us enough to help us win this war. Once a dictator gets away with his crimes, the world safety is in big danger. He will never stop.” 

The couple extends their thoughts and prayers to every person in Ukraine, and everyone affected by this awful war. 

“I never wanted to live in another country,” Valerie said. “But you never know how your life will turn out.”

Original article by Ruth Thompson, Coastal Mariner, 9/21/22. To read the original article, please visit the Coastal Mariner website.

Let the Music Move You at Village At Proprietors Green

Village At Proprietors Green in Marshfield is swaying through summer with an outdoor concert series—reminding its residents and the surrounding community of the importance of connection through music for all ages. The Summer Concert Series is being held outdoors at Village At Proprietors Green throughout June, July and August.

VPG Summer Concert Series 2022
Summer Concert Series at Village at Proprietors Green

In June and July, Village At Proprietors Green kicked off its outdoor Summer Concert Series for its residents and the public with music from several locally renowned groups including The Sharon Concert Band and The South Shore Band. The local senior living community invited all to bring their lawn chairs to enjoy the sounds of summer together—reconnecting through the common language of music.

“It was amazing to see all these folks gather to listen and just enjoy,” said Marie Murphy, resident at Village at Proprietors Green.

Marie Murphy, VPG Resident

But the fun won’t stop there; the concert series is planned to continue into August, with performances from The Satuit Band and Quintessential Brass.

Friends and families are encouraged to gather on the outdoor green to celebrate the season, the sounds, and the social connection.

“The concert series was a great way to spend the summer nights,” said Proprietors Green resident Terry Quinn. “Music plays such an important part in our lives, and it can really unify people.”

Terry Quinn, VPG Resident

The concert series allows residents to fill their evenings with life and light—engaging with each other, visitors from the local community, and the musicians.

“We all want to feel immersed and connected,” said Tom Bell, Executive Director at Village At Proprietors Green. “But it can be easy, especially for seniors, to slip into a nightly routine in the summer heat and become less active. So, we try to engage residents through activities that will invigorate them. Our residents light up when they hear live music, swaying and singing along.”

Village at Proprietors Green residents enjoying the latest summer concert in the seasonal series

According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, research shows listening to music has the ability to reduce anxiety, blood pressure, and pain; it can also improve sleep quality, mood, mental alertness, and memory. Whether making music or listening to it, one of the most beneficial aspects of music is the significant impact it has on cognitive skills. Music is shown to help seniors better process their thoughts and maintain memories, as well as bring people together—uniting spouses and family members in emotional intimacy through shared musical experiences. The improved alertness, speech, and social skills brought about by listening to music can also lead to an increase in physical activity.

This month’s events are only one example of Village At Proprietors Green’s commitment to engaging seniors in enrichment events and community bonding. With countless activities in-house, such as Zumba®, movie nights, trivia contests, ballroom dancing, book club, and more, Proprietors Green’s ability to involve residents in cultural, communal engagement sets it apart from other senior living communities.

Scenes from this year’s outdoor Summer Concert Series at Village at Proprietors Green

“I think sometimes we forget the value and weight of music, so our team members are committed to energizing residents to reawaken that part of themselves,” said Valeri Williams, Activities Director at Village at Proprietors Green. “Residents, family members, and members of the local community have all reached out to express their appreciation for the connection Village At Proprietors Green fosters and the difference it has made in their lives.”

Village At Proprietors Green, managed by Welch Senior Living, offers independent living, assisted living, and memory care services. Call 781-319-5072 or visit www.ProprietorsGreen.com for more information.

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Resident & Family Testimonials

Village at Proprietors Green has received wonderful notes and letters of appreciation from residents, families, and friends. To anyone who has sent in such a message, we say “Thank You!” Caring for your loved ones is our privilege. 


“We’re getting on in years and we wanted to have a wonderful place to live. And here we are at Allerton House in Marshfield, Massachusetts! We’ve made all kinds of friends. We love having three meals a day. We love being back in Massachusetts after having lived in Florida, Connecticut, and other places. We are just delighted to be here!”
-Maryanne and David W., Residents, Allerton House at Village at Proprietors Green

VPG Testimonial from Residents Maryanne and David W.

VPG Testimonial from Residents Janet and John Z.

VPG Testimonial from Resident Polly S.

“My mother has been so happy and well-cared for at her memory care facility, The Village at Proprietor’s Green, that I wanted to write a story for Next Avenue about the steps my sister and I took to find the right place for our mom to help others with their search. We knew immediately we made the right decision because the staff was receptive to making provisions to ease my mom’s safety and well-being. Over more than two years, we’ve been impressed by the staff’s dedication. They know our mom, her interests, and her children’s and grandchildren’s names. She is happy and safe. I wrote the story to help others in their search and have never been offered, nor have I requested, any kind of financial incentive for writing the story. My reward is knowing my mom is still learning and engaged with others and her surroundings.”
-Theresa S.B.

Click on the link below to read Theresa’s latest piece written for PBS affiliate, Next Avenue, detailing her family’s journey to find the right fit for a loved one in memory care: www.nextavenue.org/memory-care-reporter.


“Please allow me to express my gratitude to your staff for their care during my stay in October at Assisted Living of Proprietors Green. I especially wish to thank Ashley, Laura, Nancy, Kathy, and Dylan who went above and beyond. Please forward this note to them. Thank you to all there that are providing a safe, caring, and quality experience to folks on the south shore.”
-Michael V.


“My mother believes that she’s in the best possible place at this time, which is a comfort to me and my family. Our thoughts and prayers are with you all.”
-Denise B.


“I just wanted to thank you and your team for your ongoing efforts to keep everyone healthy and happy. This has been incredibly stressful for so many people and I realize how difficult it is to maintain both a healthy living and work environment during these trying times. Keep up the good work.” 
-Erin W.


“Just a note to say that you are doing an outstanding job communicating with families and residents at VPG.  You and your staff, at all levels, are doing an incredible job of taking care of the residents. It certainly gives me peace of mind knowing they are looked after by caring people.”
-Elaine L.


To learn more about Village at Proprietors Green or to schedule a tour, contact Colleen Carlson at 781.319.5072 or at ccarlson@proprietorsgreen.com.